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Reinventing Your Employee Onboarding Process

An employee’s first day is just as important to the employee as it is to the employer. The employee is most likely full of energy and enthusiasm for their new position and company. The employee had a great experience meeting with the recruiter or hiring manager and is eager to put names to faces of people on their team. They are anticipating a whirlwind first week filled with meeting new people, learning about the company, and the ins and outs of their new role and responsibilities.

 

Have you or any of your new employees ever had one of these experiences?

  • Your new employee walked up to the front desk to announce their arrival and the receptionist has no idea who they
    are.
  • The employee is placed in an empty conference room and told to wait for the trainer who never shows.
  • The employee is told by the recruiter to expect an invite for a first-day employee to get to know their teammates, but the invite is never extended.
  • Your new employee is shown to their new workspace that is not set-up.

 

A poor onboarding experience can leave the employee feeling disappointed about their new position. The employer may not realize that their onboarding deficiencies are causing negative vibes on the floor, or making their new hires feel less than.

 

A good onboarding experience takes time and thoughtfulness to execute with care. Successful onboarding programs have a similar framework.

 

Lessons Learned
Before getting started, evaluate what you know about your current onboarding process. You may have received direct feedback in the past that was not put into action. Now’s the time! Moving forward, what does a successful onboarding look like? Is your organization interested in creating long-term growth? What matters most, from the view of the business, to have accomplished in the first day or week?

 

Engage Early
Stressing over a new hire’s first day is not uncommon for employers. Successful onboarding programs include early engagement activities to help employees understand what they can expect during their first day, week, and month, information on the company background, and info on where to park, where their desk is, and names and photos of who is on their team.

 

Individual Attention at Any Level
Employers should not mistakenly assume that employees at a managerial or executive level are self-sufficient on their first day. When onboarding someone in a leadership position, consider their team, their employment and professional background, and their new level of responsibility at your company. Make time for the new hire to meet with their direct reports, other executives or leaders on their level, and ensure adequate face time to answer questions and build a report.

 

New Employee Buddy
Set each new hire up with a peer buddy. The buddy system ensures your new employee not only has someone to talk to, ask questions, and help with first-day jitters, but the buddy can also help your new employee stay focused and get up-to-speed faster. The buddy system is also great for transfers, contractors, and temporary employees. A strategic buddy system may not ensure that the two employees form a lifetime bond, but it will help assimilate the new employee into the organization.

 

The goal for a quality onboarding program should be to help new employees feel a sense of belonging. Ensure the company vision and goals are woven in throughout the program to keep the new employee inspired along the way. And while there are several elements that directly influence employee onboarding, morale, and job satisfaction, not all companies have the bandwidth to focus on honing these aspects of the business. Vensure Employer Services offers valuable products and services to help businesses like your stay competitive in the industry by attracting and retaining top talent. Contact Vensure to learn more.