01 Feb

Overlooking Health and Safety Can Come at a High Price

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When David Lindsay, Senior Loss Control Analyst and Field Support for Vensure, began his career in loss control nearly twenty years ago, he was not sure what OSHA was. OSHA, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, was created after Congress passed the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. The primary function of OSHA is to assure safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women by setting and enforcing standards and by providing training, outreach, education, and assistance. David’s desire to preserve the quality of human life and his love of meeting/talking to new people made him the perfect candidate for Vensure’s loss control team. The team, led by Bill Marshall, Director of Loss Control, has over 50 years of safety and loss control experience. Each member of the team has varying backgrounds with specialized experience in one or more of the following: Department of Defense safety standards, construction, transportation, and general industry. This combined experience allows each Loss Control Specialist to properly assess job risks associated with a company’s working environment.
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Under the General Duty Clause, Section 5(a)(1) of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are required to provide their employees with a place of employment that is “free from recognized hazards that are causing or are likely to cause death or serious harm.” Not only is providing a safe work environment for your employees the right thing to do, but it also increases employee morale, employee retention, and productivity. Too often an employers’ reason for not taking preventative safety measures in their work environment is the loss of productivity. David tells us, “In my first few months of being in loss control, I was directed to perform an accident investigation for a fabrication shop where an amputation involving multiple fingers had just occurred. During the investigation, the employer informed me that on occasion the metal shear on a machine would close on its own. When asked why he allowed the employee to operate faulty machinery, the manager responded that he told the employee about the issue and it was the employee’s responsibility to pay more attention.”

David states, “We stress to our clients the cost and time to put in safety measures, such as repairing faulty machinery, would prove to be less than the loss of productivity. The direct cost of the injury and the increased workers’ compensation rates alone could be enormous. Our goal as Loss Control Specialists for Vensure is to help our clients put measures in place to prevent employees from paying the highest price – losing their quality of life, or their life altogether, in exchange for production.”

Vensure’s loss control team offers OSHA 10-Hour General Industry and Construction training programs free to clients. The trainers are authorized by OSHA to conduct 10 and 30-hour courses under OSHA guidelines. They cover a variety of general industry and construction safety and health hazards that a worker may encounter at their worksite, as well as emphasize hazard identification, avoidance, control and prevention, fall protection, personal protective equipment, scaffolding, OSHA inspection procedures and more.

If employers were to make it a habit of not only valuing their employees’ input and feedback on safety issues and concerns but also taking advantage of a loss control preventative training program, they would see an increase in the safety and health of their employees and a decrease in their risk.

For assistance with your loss control needs, or to find out more about the free OSHA training provided by Vensure Employer Services, please reach out to the Vensure loss control department by emailing: losscontrol@vensure.com.

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