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Pros and Cons of Telecommuting

Innovations in modern technology have allowed quality candidates to join organizations remotely, from any corner of the globe, and still feel connected to the business, their colleagues, and the company mission, vision, and values. In a rather quick amount of time, telecommuting and working remotely became the future of corporate America. But not all companies are on board.

 

Employers who found immediate benefits of telecommuting were those who experienced cost savings on parking and office space, relocation costs, and were able to retain their top talent who may have otherwise had to sever their employment due to other obligations or the need to work from a different location.

 

Telecommuting is shown to improve employee productivity, as it is “estimated that employers in the US lose $1.8 trillion a year in productivity”[1] costs. Employees who work from home are subject to far fewer distractions that are commonplace in a traditional office. These employees are able to better structure their days for optimal productivity, all while promoting a healthy work/life balance.

 

Conversely, employers who are anti-remote work policies stand by their decision to opt-out of adding telecommuting policies. For example, employees who work from home have less one-on-one time with coworkers and managers, which can affect the employee’s ability to form a valuable synergy with the rest of the team and direct management.

 

Remote employees may require additional effort to ensure they feel like part of the team, including important projects or company-focused communications, and are not overlooked just because they are not physically in the office.

 

If your organization is looking to implement a telecommuting policy here are some items to consider.

 

Eligibility

Not all employees may be eligible for the telecommuting benefit. Candidates for telecommuting should not have a history of attendance issues or disciplinary action and should be considered dependable and have a comprehensive understanding of their role.

 

Job Duties

The employees eligible for or requesting a telecommuting position should be a top performer in their current role and in a solo capacity. It is also important that they are able to perform all aspects of their role from their remote location, as it is assumed the position requirements and responsibilities would not change.

 

Technology

Employees may be required to supplement some or all of the equipment needed in order to work remotely. If the organization is providing the equipment, it may become necessary to have the employee sign an acknowledgment verifying the equipment is the property of the organization and is only to be used to perform their required duties. In the event the employee leaves the organization, for any reason, all of the equipment should be returned in similar or better condition.

 

Telecommuting may not be the right addition for every company at this stage, however, it should be a regularly discussed topic. This trend is only becoming more popular, and there is no sign of slowing down when it comes to either hiring remote employees or having the company’s top performers request to move to a more flexible or remote location.

 

Regardless of whether your employees are in the office or working remotely, Vensure has the ability to implement industry-specific solutions to manage time and attendance. From robust scheduling and complex calculations to reporting and telepunch, we have the solution to fit your business needs. Contact Vensure to learn more about drag and drop scheduling, benefit accruals, or PTO and leave of absence request tracking.

 

 

 

[1] Forbes: Benefits of Telecommuting for the Future of Work